Today, I’ll take you to the south coast of Iceland.

 

I already explained why I loved the winter in Iceland so much. One sunny day (but the weather changed about five times that day. Typical Icelandic weather.) we drove down to south coast. We already have been this part of the island when we were here in August, but the weather was not on our side. We saw some part of the sceneries during the short window when the rain stopped for a few minutes but not too much. I’m really glad I took this trip this time in winter. The light was perfect ( like I mentioned in the post: Why Iceland is better in Winter), weather was mostly great and we got to see some snow!

 

Here is the route we took:

View Larger Map

 

 

The Seljalandsfoss waterfall

 

The first stop was The Seljalandsfoss waterfall. Actually I visited this waterfall in the summer and this was one of the most impressive waterfalls I’ve ever seen so far. Waterfalls are so overrated in most of the places in the world (especially in Southeast Asia, for somehow) but waterfalls in Iceland are different.

 

The Seljalandsfoss waterfall
The Seljalandsfoss waterfall

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Iceland in winter
Iceland in winter – low sunlight, brown and green landscape and blue sky.

 

 

Reynisfjara beach

Next stop: black sand beach of Reynisfjara beach with columnar basalt formations and ocean carved caves. The two columns you can see afar are a couple of trolls by Icelandic legend. This cave I was at when I took this picture, was formed by the ocean. You can see the columnar basalt formation that made by lava.

 

Reynisfjara beach with columnar basalt formations and ocean carved caves
Reynisfjara beach with the basalt formations and ocean carved caves. The two columns in the water are male and female trolls by an Icelandic legend.
Reynisfjara beach with basalt formations and ocean carved caves
Reynisfjara beach basalt formations. It lava made a hexagon shaped column.

 

 

Cape Dyrhólaey

If you want to see view of Seaside cliffs on the south coast, visit cape Dyrhólaey. But remember not to stand so close to the edge of the cliff; the wind is strong enough to push you out from the cliff. But the view was worth it!

 

Cape Dyrhólaey and the view of Seaside cliffs
Cape Dyrhólaey and the view of Seaside cliffs
Cape Dyrhólaey and the view of Seaside cliffs
Cape Dyrhólaey and the view of Seaside cliffs
Cape Dyrhólaey and the view of Seaside cliffs
Cape Dyrhólaey and the view of Seaside cliffs – It was a wild day

 

 

Skógafoss

The photogenic waterfall of  Skógafoss was our next stop after lunch. Gunnar said this particular waterfall was good to visit at certain time to see the rainbow. The sun was right behind us after lunch, and it made the perfect rainbow just like he said.

 

 Skógafoss
Full size rainbow at Skógafoss waterfall

 

 

Solheimajokull

This 400 year-old glacier allows you to approach closer, touch and feel them. Just like any other glaciers in the world, the ice in Iceland are shrinking. Gunnar said the parking lot we walked passed used to be covered by the glacier. If you want to know more about the differences of the glaciers by the climate change, check out ‘Chasing Ice’ documentary.

 

Solheimajokull
Solheimajokull – 400 year-old glacier
Solheimajokull
Solheimajokull
Solheimajokull
Solheimajokull

 

 

The folk museum at Skógar

We headed to the folk museum where you can see how the life of Icelanders changed. The museum was opened in 1949, and has outside and inside exhibits. You can walk around the traditional Icelandic house in the backyard of the museum, and see all the collections inside. The museum has been the responsibility of one man, Thordur Tomasson (28/4 1921). He started the collection of the artefacts and houses of the open-air museum and has not stopped yet. He still shows people around the museum.

 

Traditional Icelandic house at the folk museum at Skógar
Traditional Icelandic house at the folk museum at Skógar

 

 

# I was a guest of Sterna during the South coast and Volcano tour. However, all the contents are reflecting my own opinion, not Sterna’s. 

 

Sterna van

 

9 thoughts on “Runaway Photo: South Coast Iceland and Volcano”

  1. Wow I’ve never considered Iceland as a photographic destination but these pictures have definitely changed my mind. Looks cold though, I don’t do cold well 🙂

    1. Iceland is definitely a photogenic place. One of the best for me. It was very cold, but it was not too bad for a place that right below the arctic circle. 🙂

      1. Wonderful photos as always, Juno! Iceland is definitely not too cold considering how far north it is. Mind you, I may be a little biased since I live in Canada, which has some of the most extreme winter temperatures on earth! My city is actually further south than Paris or Vienna but somehow our average low in January is a frost-bite inducing -18C compared to Akureyri’s -5C. Are you over there right now?

  2. Hey Juno,

    I’m usually not one to comment, but I just read your tweet where someone bashed your writing. My advice? Ignore those comments. You have a loyal following. (myself included) I love seeing the world through your travels and pics. Keep writing! Big hug to you!!!

    🙂

    Oh, and the Iceland pics were awesome…Iceland is on my bucket list. 🙂

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