The Day I Held a Koala at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane

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The Day I Held a Koala at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane

Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane, Australia

The Day I Held a Koala in Queensland, Australia

What everyone said was true. They really do smell like cough drops. Their fur is like a high-quality floor mat, their claws are like round sickles, but their face makes you squeal an unrecognizable noise from the back of your throat and speak in a voice that is three pitches higher than your normal one. No one can argue; koalas are the cutest creatures in the entire world. Maybe pandas and baby giraffe can compete, but nothing else.

At the world’s largest and finest koala sanctuary, the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane, Australia treats their 130 koalas like a royal family. It’s a little compensation for deserting their natural sanctuary and hunting them for centuries. The koalas have unlimited access to what they want — usually meaning eucalyptus leaves, and trees to sit on. There are plenty of supplies for both. They live in different homes around the premises according to their age and gender. They have a kindergarten for toddlers, a youth compartment for teenagers, and even a retirement home for the oldies.

 

Look at this little face!

Look at this little face!

 

Koalas are certainly quite an unusual species. They resemble nothing else. They’re native to Australia, inhabiting Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia. They’re arboreal, which means they live in trees. How they sit in-between branches seems extremely uncomfortable, but apparently their bottom is densely packed and quite hard. Eucalyptus leaves make up most of their diet. Because of their limited nutrition, they sleep 20 hours a day, and are usually active at night. Males are almost twice as big as the females, and they are recognizable with a scent gland on their upper chest. And most of all, they are just So. Darn. Cute!

 

Meeting Koalas at the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

They sleep 20 hours a day

Meeting Koalas at the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Males are recognizable with a scent gland on their upper chest.

 

The best thing about visiting Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary is you get to hold a koala for a brief minute. It was like meeting a life-long hero of mine. I was utterly nervous, my palms were sweating, and I couldn’t stop making the crooked-smile I do when I’m nervous. The nice staff handed me the first koala, while distracting her with eucalyptus branches. Food is the strongest motivation, for all animals (including humans!). She was a bit jittery. I was told it must be because it was the end of her shift. Koalas are protected, so they can only work 30 minutes at a time. She expressed her frustration by knocking my sunglasses off my head. I’m an animal person from the beginning of time, so it emotionally hurt me. But I knew it wasn’t personal. We tried the second time. They brought a new koala who hadn’t started her shift yet. The second time’s the charm. She held tightly onto the side of my chest, and vigorously ate her lunch. I squealed. It was like magic. She smelled so good. She was like an oddly shaped cough drop from heaven.

There are two kinds of life: before holding a koala, and after. I held a koala. Life cannot be the same.

 

Meeting Koalas at the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Look at the claws!

Meeting Koalas at the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

She’s holding a baby

Meeting Koalas at the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Koalas live on trees

Meeting Koalas at the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Do you see the little joey?

Meeting Koalas at the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

She smells so good!

Meeting Koalas at the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Other animals live in the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary, including kangaroos

Meeting Koalas at the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

You can buy kangaroo food to feed

Juno Kim
Juno Kim
Juno Kim, a happiness-seeking storyteller. Photographer, writer, and trained mechanical engineer. Life-long nerd. I left the cubic farm to follow my true love: the world. A firm believer of serendipity, astronomy enthusiaster, and living by passion and love in life. Currently, on a quest to discover stories and find the place where I can call 'home'. Follow my journey through @RunawayJuno and Google+ .

7 Comments

  1. What a wonderful experience juno. You are right, they are one of the cuttest creatures on earth! I wish i can hold one too some day. australia is one of my dream trips 🙂

  2. jennifer says:

    Aw, baby Koala! How adorable! I never know they smelled like cough drops. I hope to experience this myself one day.

  3. Koalas are delightful creatures and the one you’re carrying in the picture seems so friendly. Love your description of them smelling like cough drops, all that eucalyptus really rubs on them like nothing else. Thanks for sharing your experience, looking forward to seeing more.

  4. […] started exploring Brisbane by visiting the Koalas at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary. What a perfect introduction. I was jetlaged and tired from a red eye flight, but koala can cure […]

  5. awww they are cute, aren’t day?? I saw them in the wild. One baby koala walked down to the road and I was inches from it. I couldn’t believe my luck! I didn’t hold a koala though. It is something I want to go back to Australia for.
    Lovely pictures, Juno!

  6. Alex Travel says:

    That’s awesome! so jelous I have always wanted to see a kangaroo haha

  7. […] This reason alone is enough to visit Australia. And before I leave Brisbane I’m hoping to hold a koala!   First immpressions are only first immpresions. I’ll be writing more about this contry […]

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